Press Release

March 16, 2020 — Rock Hill, SC.

From the publishers of Black Magic Women, An Improbable Truth, and The Grotesquerie comes yet another groundbreaking anthology. Committed to amplifying marginalized voices in speculative fiction, Mocha Memoirs Press is on a mission to publish diverse and inclusive stories featuring protagonists not often found in mainstream publishing. In that vein, Mocha Memoirs Press is proud to present SLAY: Stories of the Vampire Noire — a revolutionary anthology celebrating vampires of the African Diaspora. Featuring anchor stories by award winning authors Sheree Renee Thomas, Craig L. Gidney, Teri Clark, Jessica Cage, Michele Tracy Berger, and Steven Van Patten, SLAY aims to be the first anthology of its kind.

To provide professional Horror Writers of America rates, Mocha Memoirs has launched a crowdfunding campaign. The Indiegogo campaign will run until March 31, 2020. Interested parties can pledge at https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/slay-stories-of-the-vampire-noire#/

Contact:

Publisher

Nicole Givens Kurtz

mochamemoirspress@gmail.com

www.mochamemoirspress.com

October is #BlackSpeculativeFictionMonth, and we’re proud to celebrate; Black Speculative Fiction is our lifeblood. Started by a Black woman on a mission to amplify marginalized voices in speculative fiction, Mocha Memoirs Press was founded with the purpose of publishing those mainstream presses often ignore. From groundbreaking Afrocentric horror anthologies to Afro-Futurism and Afro-Fantasy, we are honored to offer a wide variety of Afrocentric literary delights as rich and varied as the African Diaspora itself.

As part of our #BlackSpeculativeFictionMonth celebration, we will be highlighting Black voices and Black stories, showcasing the writers whose powerful words left imprints on our souls. We’ll interview some of our own authors, learning about them and their inspiration. We’ll offer commentary and editorials on what Black Speculative Fiction means to us personally and professionally; how Black voices shaped our lives.

We’ll be publishing two new Black Speculative Fiction titles: Alice and SLAY, taking both zombies and vampires by storm.

We also discounted our entire library of previously published Black Speculative Fiction titles to $2.99 eBooks and 20% off paperbacks with code BLACK20.

Stay tuned for more #BlackSpeculativeFictionMonth excitementand more epic Black excellence!

(Originally posted on the MVMedia Blog)

Sheree Renée Thomas

1). Tell us a bit about yourself.

I was born by the river, in a little tent. And just like that river, I’ve been writing ever since.

Hat tip to Sam Cooke! No but seriously, I’m a Memphis-based writer, born near the Mississippi River on a street called Life. We moved on to Seventh, and I lived the early part of my childhood in North Memphis. My family, the city, and its culture are all a big part of how I became a writer. Everyone in Memphis is a good storyteller, and my grandparents and their friends were some of the best. I grew up listening to their stories, the made-up tales and the all too true. I was fortunate to be raised by artists in a house of books. They fostered a love for reading pretty early in me. I wrote because I loved to read. I didn’t always have paper, so my grandfather would give me the backs of bills and envelopes to write on. Whenever he could, he would bring me my favorite pencils and crisp, clean notebooks. Granddaddy always made me feel like my voice was heard.

2). What works influenced you?

My favorite books and stories were Gothic. I think Vincent Price and his amazing performances influenced that. I couldn’t watch The Fall of the House of Usher without wanting to read it. Nathaniel Hawthorne, Edgar Allan Poe, later Susan Cooper, Madeleine L’Engle, Peter Beagle, Ray Bradbury, Isaac Asimov, Ursula K. Le Guin, Alice Walker, Toni Morrison, Gloria Naylor were all important to me. There were years when I never missed a single work by Stephen King. Never! The Third Life of Grange Copeland was one of my favorite books by Ms. Walker, it, like Song of Solomon lingered with me, and Gayl Jones along with Ntozake Shange were revelations. When I read Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston, I just gave up on science fiction for a good while. I immersed myself in Black women’s writing. Margaret Walker, Sherley Anne Williams, Wanda Coleman, Bebe Moore Campbell, J. California Cooper, Tina McElroy Ansa, Lucille Clifton, Ai. Black women writers filled some empty spaces in me that I didn’t know I had.

3). If you had the choice, would you be a vampire?

Nope. Too messy and trifling. Even though the idea of exploring the world indefinitely has its appeal—never enough time to read all the good books, see all the sights and tings—what about love? What about your family? They can’t travel with you. They are gone. I want to be where my loved ones are. I want to see the smiling faces of my family, friends, and ancestors.

4). Who is your favorite vampire?

Ganga from Bill Gunn’s Ganga & Hess is my favorite vampire, as depicted in the original director’s cut that thank goodness, someone had the good sense to preserve and protect. I love that movie! Have watched it many, many times, and each viewing reveals something else. The beautiful, sultry Marlene Clark (Lord Shango) stars as Ganga Meda and Duane Clark (Night of the Living Dead) is Dr. Hess, a Black anthropologist who is turned into a vampire after he’s assaulted with an antique African blade. The knife was looted from a mysterious kingdom led by Queen Myrthia. Spike Lee did his version of the film, Da Sweet Blood of Jesus. The production design was wonderful and helped generate interest in the original for a whole new generation of viewers. I love the spirituality explored in Bill’s movie, the gospel music created by Nina Simone’s brother, Sam Waymon, who also co-starred in it, the blues of Mabel King (from What’s Happening!!), whose voice and cameo made me go back and look up the story of her life. I never knew she was a musician until I saw Bill Gunn’s film.

5). What do you like the most about SLAY?

I love that readers can enter so many different worlds. SLAY features vampires from throughout Africa and the African diaspora, all written by some great writers. When I think of black vampires, not many come to mind. William Marshall gave Blacula its dignity and backstory when he created the storyline of the African prince meeting with Count Dracula to discuss the slave raids and its impact on his people. Eddie Murphy and Angela Bassett made A Vampire in Brooklyn a go-to fun dark comedy and horror (shout out to Kadeem Hardison whose Renfield-like character remains hilarious and a highlight of the movie). Charles Michael Davis as Marcel Gerard in The Originals has a pretty full character arc as a Black vampire. Midnight Texas, Twilight, the amazing Tara from True Blood, also had Black vampire characters, but we didn’t get to be immersed in their worlds. With SLAY you’ve got a myriad of Black vampire characters to explore.

6). What inspired you to write Love Hangover?

Nicole Kurtz’s invitation to write for SLAY was a great excuse to try my hand at writing my own version of a vampire. I wanted to set the story in an era I was always curious about. Since I was born too late to get down in the 1970s nightclubs of the Disc era, writing “Love Hangover” was an excellent way to enjoy some great music and discover the interesting history that comes from research.

7). Tell us a bit about your story.

“Love Hangover” is about all the red flags we miss when we are infatuated, falling in love and lust. It’s about the stories we tell ourselves about the people we are sexually attracted to, the images we create that gloss over the darker edges of reality. The pedestals we prop up for celebrities and the beautiful ones, as Prince described them. Set in the glittering, neon-lit nights of the New York City nightclubs, the story takes place on a fateful night in 1979. Frankie falls hard for Delilah Divine and it’s not quite the adventure they thought it would be.

8). What do you hope to accomplish with Love Hangover?

I want to transport readers to a time that perhaps they never experienced or imagined, while making them think about the ways we humans struggle to connect. I also want you to stop hatin’ on Disco music. Without Disco there is no House and without House, well … Luther said a house is not a home without love and all of this music was about love. Read the story, enjoy it, and think about how we can all love ourselves and each other better.

9). Will there be more stories about these characters?

Absolutely, yes! Delilah Divine is a character that is loosely connected to characters in “Head Static,” a short story, and to “Shanequa’s Blues—Or, Another Shotgun Lullaby,” a novelette. Both are original works featured in my debut prose collection, Nine Bar Blues: Stories from an Ancient Future that was released in May by Third Man Books.

10). How do we keep up with all things Sheree Renée Thomas?

Visit https://www.shereereneethomas.com and sign up for my mailing list or follow me on Facebook/Instagram: @shereereneethomas and on Twitter: @blackpotmojo

11). What advice would you give to writers?

Read wildly and widely, as voraciously and purposefully as you write. Read for fun, then read like a writer. Imagine the world with your work in it. See it, as Octavia E. Butler reminded us, and be all about the creation of it. New life takes nurturing. Imaginations do, too. Don’t give up on yourself. Take breaks as you need it. Manifest by putting your words and vision on the page. Write the jacket copy of your bio, the way you’d hope to see it in your first published story, poem, movie, or first book. Display or store it somewhere close to you, a visual talisman that helps you imagine a way forward. Spend more time exploring your voice and the stories that make you think and feel, that create a sense of wonder in you. Be easy on your first drafts. They are good because they are a beginning. Keep writing and have faith that one day, you will reach the end. Then start all over again. Revise and reimagine. When you finish, do like August Wilson, write the first line so a new story, a new journey can begin.

Read NINE BAR BLUES: Stories from an Ancient Future by Sheree Renée Thomas

https://www.shereereneethomas.com/book-inner

To read Love Hangover by by Sheree Renee Thomas and the other amazing stories in this fantastic anthology, preorder your e-book today!

Slay: Stories Of The Vampire Noire

(Originally posted on the MVMedia Blog)

Milton Davis

1). Tell us a bit about yourself.

I’m an indie author and owner of MVmedia, LLC, a publishing company specializing in science fiction and fantasy based on African/African Diaspora culture, history and traditions. I’ve written and published 21 novels and edited/co-edited seven anthologies.

2). Who is your favorite vampire author?

Actually, I don’t have one. But I must mention L. A. Banks for everything she did for the genre and others.

3). If you had the choice, would you be a vampire?

No. I don’t think I would like the taste of blood.

4). Who is your favorite vampire?

Blade, hands down.

5). What do you like the most about Slay?

I’m always a fan of anthologies and books that feature Black main characters and support Black authors. I’m also a fan of Nicole Smith. Who can say no to her?

6). What inspired you to write Bloodlines ?

I was inspired by my author friends. A lot of them are horror authors, so I decided to try my hand at it. I wanted to see if I could add a different spin on the vampire mythology.

7). Tell us a bit about your story.

Bloodlines is a story about a genetically engineered vampire who discovers what being a ‘true’ vampire really means.

8). What do you hope accomplish with Bloodlines?

I hope it entertains readers first and foremost, and I hope it adds a different spin to vampire mythos.

9). Will there be more stories about Telisa?

There could be. If there is a Slay II and I’m invited, then yes.

10). How do we keep up with all things Milton Davis?

You can check me out on Instagram at @obadoro, twitter as @Thegriot, and I’m on Facebook as well. I also have an author website (www.miltonjdavis.com), and there’s my publishing website, www.mvmediaatl.com

11). What advice would you give to Slay readers about this anthology?

It’s hot! Find a comfortable seat, fix your favorite beverage, then sit back and be amazed! Oh yeah, and spread the word.

To read Bloodlines by Milton Davis and the other amazing stories in this fantastic anthology, preorder your e-book today!

Slay: Stories Of The Vampire Noire

(Originally posted on the MVMedia Blog)

Dicey Grenor

1). Tell us a bit about yourself.

Been practicing law in TX since 2005. Been married since 2007. Been a mom since 2007. Been writing and publishing sci-fi fantasy horror fiction since 2011. Been hosting the Sex & Horror Podcast since 2019. Been writing scripts since February 2020. Been a misfit since 1974.

2). Who is your favorite vampire author?

JR Ward. Because her vamps are sexy af.

3). If you had the choice, would you be a vampire?

Without hesitation.

4). Who is your favorite vampire?

Sleepy Willow—my narcoleptic vampire character.

5). What do you like the most about Slay?

Black vampires. In the words of Issa Rae: “I’m rooting for everybody black.”

6). What inspired you to write (your story)?

As with many of my stories, it derived from a random-ass conversation with my husband.

7). Tell us a bit about your story.

DIARY OF A MAD BLACK VAMPIRE: a bored vampire meets an equally bored human and chronicles the budding, albeit risky relationship.

8). What do you hope to accomplish with your story?

Entertain readers. Provide an escape from all that ails them for at least a few minutes.

9). Will there be more stories about your character?

Nope. ‘Fraid not. I’ve written several other vampire stories though, if anyone’s interested.

10). How do we keep up with all things Dicey Grenor?

I’m all over social media as @diceygrenor. Follow and engage. Please and thanks.

11). What advice would you give to Slay readers about this anthology?

Promote the hell out of it. Let the world know we’re out here writing stories you want to read. Show the supply. Stimulate the demand. We’ll keep writing them.

To read Dicey Grenor’s story and the other amazing stories in this fantastic anthology, preorder your e-book today!

Slay: Stories Of The Vampire Noire

(Originally posted on the MVMedia Blog)

Oghenechovwe Donald Ekpeki

1). Tell us a bit about yourself.

My name is Oghenechovwe Donald Ekpeki. I am an African speculative fiction writer from, and resident in Nigeria. I am a slush reader, writer and editor.

2). Who is your favorite vampire author?

Anne Rice.

3). If you had the choice, would you be a vampire?

Without a second thought. Sexy, powerful and immortal. Who wouldn’t?

4). Who is your favorite vampire?

Lestat de Lioncourt.

5). What do you like the most about Slay?

I like it’s assortment of brilliant authors, a lot of which I have read before and am proud to have my work appear besides.

6). What inspired you to write your story?

Well, I suppose the same thoughts that made the editor compile the anthology, I wanted to see, feel or enjoy a vampire story by and for people like me. I wrote my story a while ago, years back in fact. What’s that they say, great minds think alike. If the editor didn’t compile this anthology, I would have, eventually.

7). Tell us a bit about your story.

Well it’s based on some almost real experiences and people, from back in my life. Just throw in a couple hundred vampires, magic swords and a lot of blood and gore.

8). What do you hope accomplish with your story?

Honestly, I just want the reader to be entertained, to have a good time and smile, or even shake their head ruefully. Nothing so serious. Just vampires. Right?

9). Will there be more stories of your character?

We’ll see. I’ll be looking to see how he’s received. I was writing a bit unconventionally from how I currently do. I mentioned it was written a while back. So I’ll be watching to see if my character is appreciated. If not, cancelled.

10). How do we keep up with all things Oghenechovwe Donald Ekpeki?

Well, that’s easy. My Twitter and website.

11). What advice would you give to Slay readers about this anthology?

Strap yourself in and get ready for one h** of a ride.

To read Oghenechovwe Donald Ekpeki’s story and the other amazing stories in this fantastic anthology, preorder your e-book today!

Slay: Stories Of The Vampire Noire

(Originally posted on the MVMedia Blog)

Valjeanne Jeffers

1). Tell us a bit about yourself.

I’m a speculative fiction writer, a Spelman College graduate, a member of the Horror Writers Association and the Carolina African America Writers’ Collective. I’m the author of nine books, including my Immortal and Mona Livelong: Paranormal Detective series, and I’ve been published in numerous anthologies including: Steamfunk!; Sycorax’s Daughters; Black Magic Women and, most recently, All the Songs We Sing, and Bledrotica Volume I. I’ll be releasing my tenth novel, Mona Livelong: Paranormal Detective: The Case of the Vanishing Child later this year.

2). Who is your favorite vampire author?

If you had asked me this last year, I would have said Anne Rice. But recently, I have a new favorite: Penelope Flynn (who also has a story in Slay). I’m not shy, at least not about anything writing-related, so I don’t mind saying that I love to read (and write) about vampires of color.

3). If you had the choice, would you be a vampire?

Definitely! I have loved vampires since I was a little girl watching Dracula and Dark Shadows.  I was never afraid of them. Instead I envied their immortality and preternatural powers. And I always felt like they got a raw deal in movies and TV shows. Why did they always have to be evil, and why did they always have to die? When I started writing about them, I vowed to fix this.

4). Who is your favorite vampire?

“Blacula,” hands down! I love the concept of an African vampire reborn to seek out his immortal bride. The cherry on top is the 70s setting and funky music (although I don’t care much for the ending).

5). What do you like the most about Slay?

Slay is a groundbreaking anthology, a collection of diverse and talented authors, all writing about vampires of color. For me, it is a dream come true, and an honor, to be able to see my name alongside them, and to be able to share my voice.

6). What inspired you to write Beautiful Monsters?

When I first saw the call for submissions, I realized that I had never written about traditional vampires, as much as I love them,  only vampires that drink time (as in my novel Immortal III: Stealer of Souls). This inspired me to try my writing hand at creating a vampire more along the lines of those I grew up watching.

7). Tell us a bit about your story.

In my story, “Beautiful Monsters” Sanyu is young black vampire. Young in the sense that she’s only a few centuries old. She drinks blood. But she is also a skilled warrior fighting to free her people from an oppressive sheriff. In this sense, she’s something of an “anti-hero.” Beautiful Monsters is set in an alternate steamfunk world, so I had a chance to write using two of my favorite tropes: steamfunk and vampires.

8). What do you hope accomplish with Beautiful Monsters?

I hope to entertain my readers with story that has lots of action and also give them a tale that will leave them feeling breathless and upbeat.

9). Will there be more stories about Sanyu?

Someone suggested that I develop “Beautiful Monsters” into a novel. I haven’t decided whether to create a novel based on Sanyu, but I’m betting she’s going to show up in future novels and stories.

10). How do we keep up with all things Valjeanne Jeffers?

Folks can visit me at: www.vjeffersandqveal.com

http://tehotep.wixsite.com/scierogenous

http://tehotep.wixsite.com/immortaliiiaudiobook

https://www.facebook.com/valjeanne.jeffers

11). What advice would you give to Slay readers about this anthology?

Readers you are in for a wonderful (and sometimes frightening) journey– one unlike any before. So, sit back and enjoy.

To read Beautiful Monsters by Valjeanne Jeffers and the other amazing stories in this fantastic anthology, preorder your e-book today!

Slay: Stories Of The Vampire Noire

(Originally posted on the MVMedia Blog)

Lynette Hoag

1). Tell us a bit about yourself.

I am an attorney and married mother of one son, one cat and one Doodle. We live in Oak Park, just west of Chicago.

2). Who is your favorite vampire author?

Anne Rice

3). If you had the choice, would you be a vampire?

Yes. Why not?

4). Who is your favorite vampire?

Dracula as played by Frank Langella. I’m still infatuated with his performance.

5). What do you like the most about Slay?

The fantasy element that allows writers to be creative in countless ways.

6). What inspired you to write your story?

The character of Amondi was inspired by Lupita Nyong’o and the night typist at my first job. I never met her. But the dictation appeared, magically, each morning, typed. I wondered: What does she do when she’s not typing? It could be literally anything, including vampire slayer.

7). Tell us a bit about your story.

Amondi Jekesai is a part-time Vampire Assassin. Talen Teasdale calls her for help with his wife. He’s not sure, but he thinks his wife might be a vampire.

8). What do you hope accomplish with your story?

It’s a short story that I hope to turn into a novel.

9). Will there be more stories of your character?

Absolutely! I’m working on one now.

10). How do we keep up with all things Lynette Hoag?

Lynette S. Hoag my facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/leftbrainmomand on Twitter @LeftBrainMom

11). What advice would you give to Slay readers about this anthology?

Prepare to be addicted and left wanting more.

To read Lynette Hoag’s story and the other amazing stories in this fantastic anthology, preorder your e-book today!

Slay: Stories Of The Vampire Noire

(Originally posted on the MVMedia Blog)

L. Marie Wood

1). Tell us a bit about yourself.

Hi! I’m L. Marie Wood and I am a psychological horror author. When I’m not writing horror fiction, I am reading it. When I’m not doing that, I am teaching ways to create it. When I’m not doing that, I am watching it. Gosh, I’m scaring myself now.

2). Who is your favorite vampire author?

Anne Rice because, you know, Lestat.

3). If you had the choice, would you be a vampire?

Well, now… I guess it depends on whether you mean the Nosferatu kind or the Queen Akasha kind. I’d need to know that going in.

4). Who is your favorite vampire?

Lestat. His demeanor, his attitude… he is a mood.

5). What do you like the most about Slay?

All vampires, all the time! This is my kind of reading. I’m honored to have a story in such an incredible collection.

6). What inspired you to write your story?

It just came to me one day, as most of my stories do. I didn’t set out to write it, but when I started typing, that’s what happened.

7). Tell us a bit about your story.

The club. Enchanting beat. Swaying bodies. Vampires. ‘Nuff said.

8). What do you hope accomplish with your story?

No goal in mind other than transporting readers into a fantasy world for a little while – we could definitely use that kind of respite right now.

9). Will there be more stories of your character?

No. Yes. I don’t know.

10). How do we keep up with all things L. Marie Wood?

Check me out at www.lmariewood.com or @LMarieWood1 on Twitter.

11). What advice would you give to Slay readers about this anthology?

Read in broad daylight when the vampires are tucked away, keep some garlic handy, and stakes… you’ll need plenty of stakes…

To read L. Marie Wood’s story and the other amazing stories in this fantastic anthology, preorder your e-book today!

Slay: Stories Of The Vampire Noire

(Originally posted on the MVMedia Blog)

John Linwood Grant

1). Tell us a bit about yourself.

I’m a born and bred Yorkshireman, a hardy breed from the bleak coast of the North of England, and I’m a writer and editor. I started late in life, but I’ve had sixty plus stories published in the last four or five years, plus a novel and novella or two – a range of dark contemporary horror, weird fiction, and period supernatural tales. I also edit Occult Detective Magazine, and a number of anthologies. Far more importantly, I live with rescue dogs, my greatest delight. And I have my own beard.

2). Who is your favorite vampire author?

Ironically, I’m not a great vampire fan. If I write about them myself, I usually try to deconstruct the ideas, to get away from the world of ‘draculas’. Maybe I’ll have to say Stoker, simply because like it or not, his concept has had such an impact on the market for eerie stories. Good for writers, at least.

3). If you had the choice, would you be a vampire?

If you’d asked me in my thirties or forties, I might have been interested. Nowadays, the idea of being undying but with back-ache and bad knees is somehow less appealing. And how would I trim that beard with no mirrors?

4). Who is your favorite vampire?

Have to be Blade – and although the show was badly flawed, I did like Peter Mensah as Lemuel, the Black vampire in the TV series ‘Midnight Texas’. In terms of nostalgia, and despite what I said above, I suppose I still have fond memories of Christopher Lee’s Dracula.

5). What do you like the most about Slay?

The fact that’s it’s a whole anthology full of Black major characters. We all know that for a long time there was a tedious habit of Black characters playing supernumerary roles – either as the tragic victim, the ‘mysterious’ source of deep wisdom, the loyal secondary friend, and so on. So to go all out on Black vampires like this is great – and to be allowed to play here is a genuine thrill for me.

6). What inspired you to write Snake Hill Blues?

I often write about the 1920s, so the thought of a vampiric threat in the bustle and contradictions of Twenties Harlem, such a complex blend of new ideas, inequalities, and progress. Bright lights, clubs and dark tenements, dollars aplenty, and poverty next door. A good feeding ground for a vampire, especially if one hadn’t been hunting there before. Snake Hill, or Slang Berg, is real, by the way – the area’s now called Marcus Garvey Park.

7). Tell us a bit about your story.

In short – a blood-walker gets lazy and stops bothering to cover up his kills properly. And he might have gotten away with it, but he has the singular misfortune that Mamma Lucy, a particularly ornery hoodoo-woman, is in town. When one of his victims is linked to where she’s staying, it’s time for her to step up…

8). What do you hope to accomplish with Snake Hill Blues?

It’s meant to be slightly different, and maybe interesting. It matters to me that all of the significant characters, including the protagonist and antagonist, are Black, and they’re living out normal lives – they’re not there to make a ‘point’. It’s a further exploration of my interest in folk magic in the UK and the States – that aspect (and yeah, being stubborn and old) is what connects me to Mamma Lucy. She relies on the imaginative use of conjure and root-work, plus her natural canny mind – psychology – rather than grand, showy sorcery. Just folk magic, as I say.

9). Will there be more stories of Mamma Lucy?

There are a few published already, and more to come. They’ve been very popular, but there’s always that awareness that they have to be written with care and respect. The Twenties are a period of huge achievements and dreadful, wicked inequity. Mamma Lucy doesn’t – and can’t – put that society right, but she focuses on people’s problems as she meets them, especially the problems of people of the Black Diaspora.

10). How do we keep up with all things Linwood Grant?

I’m fairly lively on Facebook, though useless on Twitter. My website greydogtales.com is fairly busy, and my Amazon Author page probably has most details of my published writing on it.

11). What advice would you give to Slay readers about this anthology?

I could say just enjoy the stories. But on a larger scale – promote it on social media; recommend it to friends and people you meet. Review it. Create a demand for such books, and in the process, increase the market for Black writers, and for Black characters with real agency. Even have a go at writing such things yourselves, if you fancy it!

To read Snake Hill Blues by John Linwood Grant and the other amazing stories in this fantastic anthology, preorder your e-book today!

Slay: Stories Of The Vampire Noire

(Originally posted on the MVMedia Blog)

Jeff Carroll

1). Tell us a bit about yourself.

I am a semi woke guy who writes stories with a little bit of historical awareness and lots of action. I write novels, comics and screenplays. I go to the movies every week when I’m not at a comic convention. I started making micro budget horror movies and now I cross my stories into each medium.

2). Who is your favorite vampire author?

LA Banks is my favorite vampire author. I love her Huntress series. It was a beautiful mix of Hip Hop and paranormal elements. I met her a few times and still have an email she sent me.

3). If you had the choice, would you be a vampire?

I would if it was the type of vampire in one of my stories. Some vampires can’t control their animalist craves and others are deformed. My vampires are a mixture but, most are like Blade.

4). Who is your favorite vampire?

I’ll exclude the vampire in my story so, that leaves Blade. I like him because he is a badass but, also because he can control himself.

5). What do you like the most about Slay?

I love that is brings together Black writers and gives them a platform. I am looking forward to reading the other stories. Slay was a challenge for me because the only vampires I had in my stories were villains. It was fun creating a story were they weren’t monsters.

6). What inspired you to write your story?

I had written a Fan Fiction comic strip spoofing Tracey Morgan’s The Last OG. The idea I had was too good for it to be limited to just a comic strip that I couldn’t put out.

7). Tell us a bit about your story.

My story is about a vampire who awakes after a 100 year sleep.

8). What do you hope accomplish with your story?

I really enjoyed writing and creating my character and story world. I would really like to continues the story in a comic book and a novel with fan support.

9). Will there be more stories of your character?

I hope so. I don’t know.

10). How do we keep up with all things Jeff Carroll?

My books are found on my Amazon Author page. I do not have a website. I am very active on Facebook under my name. I have a Youtube page that needs subscribers it is RBGPromotions.

11). What advice would you give to Slay readers about this anthology?

For everyone reading this book enjoy it and open your mind to all of the different imagined universes that these Black writers created. Support their other works and if you find a story or a few stories that you like suggest them to television and cartoon producers. If you like what you read and you are a real fan of vampires and Black paranormal stories then promote these types of projects and the authors in it.

To read Jeff’s story and the other amazing stories in this fantastic anthology, preorder your e-book today!

Slay: Stories Of The Vampire Noire